August 12, 2022

Eggs Museum in Moldovita: at the Crossroads of Art and Tradition

Egg painting is among the oldest and crucial Easter customs in Romania. While the custom prevails to all Central and Eastern European countries, the custom of decorating the Easter eggs with complicated folkloric motifs is more specific to Romania, specifically to the area of Bucovina, where it became an art in its own right. True gems come out of these peoples hands, whose workmanship made Romanian Easter eggs famous all over the world.

Eggs Museum In Moldovita: At The Crossroads Of Art And Tradition

Decorated eggs from Bucovina

Eggs Museum In Moldovita: At The Crossroads Of Art And Tradition

Throughout the years, Bucovina has ended up being the house of painted eggs– a territory where this art has actually been sacredly preserved and passed down from generation to generation. I dont believe there is a single traveler who checked out Bucovina and has not bought at least one painted egg as a souvenir.

Eggs Museum In Moldovita: At The Crossroads Of Art And Tradition

Romanian Easter eggs at the Eggs Museum “Lucia Condrea”

Eggs Museum In Moldovita: At The Crossroads Of Art And Tradition

The Art of Easter Egg Painting in Romania

Eggs Museum In Moldovita: At The Crossroads Of Art And Tradition

There are two various techniques of embellishing Easter eggs in Romania: by using paint and a brush, or by using wax. The latter strategy is also understood as “încondeiere.” Both practices achieve equally incredible outcomes.

Eggs Museum In Moldovita: At The Crossroads Of Art And Tradition

The chromatic scheme which might vary from area to area, includes a series of basic colors like yellow, red, navy blue, black and even white.

Eggs Museum In Moldovita: At The Crossroads Of Art And Tradition

Egg painting is a careful task that takes skill and persistence. The decorative themes can be really varied, blending astral signs with vegetal and animal representations and standard components from the rural life.

Easter eggs show at the Eggs Museum in Moldovita, Romania

The most lovely and suggestive inked eggs are those originating from the Hutsuls, an ethno-cultural group of Ukrainians who have occupied the northern regions of Romania for centuries. This group of population who still lives in some villages of Bucovina and Maramures is all acknowledged for their craft of decorating beautiful Easter eggs, which ended up being emblematic of them.

The Eggs Museum in Moldovita

After ending up the very first pattern, she dips the egg into a light color– typically yellow. Then she puts it into the melted wax to cover the color mark. The wax has the function of sealing the color. As a result, the artist can subsequently dip the egg in several other colors, without them facing each other. With each dipping increasingly more ornamental lines appear..

In addition to the artists developments, the Eggs Museum Lucia Condrea likewise includes two other collections. Among old painted eggs from the Hutsul towns around, and a global collection.

Among the finest known Romanian artists in the field of egg painting with wax is Lucia Condrea, member of the National Union of Plastic Artists in Romania. Lucia, who comes from an old household of Hutsuls, learned this craft from her paternal grandmother. She exposes her “ovoid gems” in exhibitions all around the world, and even has her own Eggs Museum in Moldovita..

Case screen at the Eggs Museum in Moldovita.

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Abstract themes.

Egg painting is one of the earliest and most essential Easter customs in Romania. While the custom is typical to all Central and Eastern European countries, the customized of decorating the Easter eggs with complicated folkloric themes is more specific to Romania, especially to the region of Bucovina, where it ended up being an art in its own. True gems come out of these peoples hands, whose workmanship made Romanian Easter eggs popular all over the world.

Eggs Museum Lucia Condrea, in Moldovita.

” Chisita”– the unique tool used for drawing on the eggs.

The Eggs Museum was established in 1993 at the initiative of the artist and includes a large collection of eggs, many of which are her own creations. The eggs– which differ in meaning, size and design– have an enormous creative worth and are absolutely unique.

The ovoid shape of the egg requires a compositional conception that is frequently challenging to achieve. She divides the surface of the egg shell in 4 areas by drawing two axles.

Her patterns include an entire location of components which differ from traditional Romanian patterns and spiritual symbols to geometrical, astral, and zoomorphic concepts. Each egg has its own distinct design, including refinement, imagination, and delicacy.

International egg collection at the Eggs Museum in Moldovita.

The drawing technique begins by covering the egg surface area in wax. Then she makes the style using a special tool– called “chisita”– which is made of a thin metal that connects to a flat stick.

Lucia Condrea, Romanian artist specializing in egg painting.

Lucia Condreas painting technique is extremely fascinating to watch. She carefully chooses her eggs. For guaranteeing the outcome lots of aspects of the egg are essential. Like the strength of the shell, or the size of the egg. Then she drains pipes the eggs material so what stays is simply the delicate outside.

The last color she uses is black. In the end, she carefully heats the egg to melt down the wax. The egg finally reveals its entire decorative appeal..

As a result, the artist can consequently dip the egg in a number of other colors, without them running into each other. Similar in style, the eggs she paints are in fact really different in quality from the Romanian Easter eggs youll find in the stores.

Situated in one of the most gorgeous villages in Bucovina, the museum inhabits two levels of the artists home and stretches over a surface area of 500 square meters. There are 56 glass cases including practically 6,000 displays.

From a Christian point of view, the Easter egg is a symbol of Jesus Christs resurrection after his crucifixion. Therefore, decorating the Easter eggs became a cherished custom in the Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches in Romania, where red paint represents the blood of Jesus Christ that was shed on the cross.

Romanian Easter eggs from Bucovina.

Embellished hard-boiled eggs are constantly present on the table during the Easter holiday. Romanians like consuming them and can hardly wait to “knock” eggs on the very first day of Easter, verifying to each other that “Christ is increased!” And the standard response they receive is: “He is increased undoubtedly!”.

Eggs are as much a part of the Easter holiday as the roasted lamb or the Sunday service. However before their association with Easter, painted eggs were part of a Pagan tradition associated to the rituals of spring..

The Lost Path series (” Cārare Rātācitā”).

The artist uses her own inking strategies, which obtain from the traditional batik method. Her results are impressive! Although similar in design, the eggs she paints are actually very various in quality from the Romanian Easter eggs youll find in the stores.

Looking at the incredible displays you realize it takes more than talent and hard work to get to this level of art. The detailed designs and poetic names of Lucias productions expose a vibrant creativity: Tears of Joy, Parallel Worlds, Between Dream and Reality, Our Daily Bread, the Lost Path.

Easter Eggs Origin, Symbolism and Traditions in Romania.

Egg Painting Techniques.

Egg painting strategy.