August 12, 2022

How to optimise your mirrorless camera tilt screen for waist level shooting with a piece of wood

If you just want to shoot from the waist then this is a tutorial for you.

How To Optimise Your Mirrorless Camera Tilt Screen For Waist Level Shooting With A Piece Of Wood

The concept spans around taking a Canon EOS M200 (or a similar video camera with a tilting screen) and adding a wedge-shaped piece of wood (40x55x800mm). Together they change this camera into a Hasselblad 907x lookalike. Its something of a follow-up to my 2015 short article on how to do this with a Canon Powershot N.

How To Optimise Your Mirrorless Camera Tilt Screen For Waist Level Shooting With A Piece Of Wood

The making of the kite-shaped piece of wood is explained in the schema below:

How To Optimise Your Mirrorless Camera Tilt Screen For Waist Level Shooting With A Piece Of Wood

At my local woodshop. I ordered 4 wedge-shaped pieces of wood (40 x 55 x 800mm) (around EUR10,-).

How To Optimise Your Mirrorless Camera Tilt Screen For Waist Level Shooting With A Piece Of Wood

Get rid of the excess wood to alter the wedge shape into a kite shape. Saw a little part from a huge wood stir stick (28 x 40 x 4mm).

How To Optimise Your Mirrorless Camera Tilt Screen For Waist Level Shooting With A Piece Of Wood

The images and pictures listed below show the idea of the build:

How To Optimise Your Mirrorless Camera Tilt Screen For Waist Level Shooting With A Piece Of Wood

Tips on building the wood body part

How To Optimise Your Mirrorless Camera Tilt Screen For Waist Level Shooting With A Piece Of Wood

You can customize it by painting it in your own favorite color.

The cam body on the inside isnt completely rectangular. A small strip of wood has actually to be removed to let it fit under the pop-up flash.

To actually enjoy holding the new wood body part of the electronic camera youll need to round the edges. For this I utilized sandpaper.

The wooden stir stick (normally used to stir wall paint) I got free of charge at my local DIY shop.

The use of the AE-Lock button is somewhat hindered by the wooden grip. Getting rid of some wood the size of your thumb would remove this discomfort.

You might wish to stop the video camera screw from coming loose from the ground plate. For this, I utilized a small piece of an old inner tube from a racing bike. These are thinner than inner tubes for a regular bike.

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The concept spans around taking a Canon EOS M200 (or a comparable cam with a tilting screen) and adding a wedge-shaped piece of wood (40x55x800mm). Eliminate the excess wood to change the wedge shape into a kite shape. Saw a little part from a big wooden stir stick (28 x 40 x 4mm).

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You might desire to stop the cam screw from coming loose from the ground plate. For this, I utilized a little piece of an old inner tube from a racing bike.

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