May 16, 2022

The Rode VideoMic GO II should be your new go-to low budget on-camera microphone

Impressions

Ive been using one for a little while now and have actually done some tests and contrasts on the cam and when its plugged into a computer as a digital USB audio gadget. Ive likewise done tests with and without the windscreen to see how well it stands up to the breezy weather weve been having just recently in Scotland.

Rode just recently launched their brand-new Rode VideoMic GO II, replacing the VideoMic GO in their lineup. This isnt simply an upgrade, its a complete overhaul, redesigned from the ground up. It presents a pretty major upgrade over its predecessor that acquires a number of features from its more costly huge brother the Rode VideoMic NTG, consisting of the new holey style as well as USB connection.

Theres very little in package that the VideoMic GO II is available in. theres the microphone itself with the foam windscreen, a shock mount to repair it atop your cam through the hotshoe and a 3.5 mm TRS to TRS cable to send out the signal out from your microphone and into your cam.

This is what is available in package!

Like the Rode VideoMic NTG, the VideoMic GO II has handy markers printed onto the microphone itself to let you rapidly and quickly adjust the arms of the shock mount precisely where they need to be. This prevents them from being too close together or too far apart, optimising microphone placement for optimal impact.

The markers sit simply inside the red arms of the holder

As quickly as you pull that foam windshield off the microphone, its similarity to the design of the Rode NTG5 and VideoMic NTG ends up being rather obvious. The only genuine difference is the length and lack of buttons compared to the VideoMic NTG.

Likewise various from the VideoMic NTG is the fact that theres no battery inside this one. It counts on plug-in power, provided by your cameras microphone socket. Like the VideoMic NTG, the VideoMic GO II features a USB socket for when you want to use it as a digital audio gadget plugged straight into your computer system or mobile phone.

The USB audio socket for digital audio communications

It can get much more power than it can from your cameras microphone socket when its plugged into your computer. This powers not just the USB digital audio user interface but also provides you with much of the VideoMic NTGs functions that you can tweak through the Rode Central app. And when youre using it as a USB mic, the output port ends up being an earphone display.

Rode Central lets you make it possible for items like the Pad, High Pass Filter, Presence boost and change input level

Mounting it to the camera is as basic and straightforward as mounting practically any other on-camera shotgun microphone Rode makes and the provided cable television is just the best length to go from the audio output socket on your microphone to the audio input socket on your cam.

How does it sound on the cam?

The VideoMic GO II is absolutely much more detailed in sound and performance to the VideoMic NTG than it is to the VideoMicro, and you can hear it, for sure. Theyre dont quite sound identical, though.

I had not listened to all three microphones side-by-side till I was modifying that video footage, but while I was modifying, the VideoMic GO II sounded very outstanding– bearing in mind, that each of these microphones was recorded directly into the cam and Panasonic isnt popular for its terrific preamps.

Fortunately, it appears that the Rode VideoMic GO II doesnt truly require any sound decrease for the many part– that will depend upon just how bad your cams preamps may be, however. Ive applied none at all in the video above to the 3 microphones being compared and even on Sennheiser HD25 studio headphones, I couldnt hear any sound that was sidetracking or really all that noticeable at all.

If youre just using it for a sync track to match up with externally taped audio in post, then the possible hiss isnt a problem anyhow, but if youre a vlogger, frequently pointing the electronic camera back at yourself and utilizing the on-camera microphone as the primary audio source for your video, it most definitely does!

The VideoMicro is the quietest and the VideoMic NTG is the loudest with the VideoMic GO II sitting someplace in between but leaning closer to the VideoMic NTG. The VideoMic NTG is primarily only the winner here since it has that integrated dial that lets you increase the gain by up to 15dB for a much stronger signal to noise ratio and does not truly need any boost in post.

Three Panasonic G80 (G85 for folks in the USA) holding the Rode VideoMicro, VideoMic GO II and VideoMic NTG.

While the VideoMic GO II tapes a really reputable sound, the VideoMic NTG uses a bit more presence to the voice (even without the built-in existence boost being allowed). At least on-camera through the TRS output.

The VideoMicro, on the other hand, has a fairly weak signal and the microphone style and capsule isnt as efficient nor as brand-new tech as the others. This means that when it gets enhanced approximately match them, so does the electronic cameras preamp sound. Running noise reduction on audio from the VideoMicro (and the initial VideoMic GO II) was quite standard prior to I switched to the VideoMic NTG– now I rarely need to do any sort of sound reduction in post.

Its most likely worth explaining at this point that its just when you hear the 3 side-by-side that you understand just how noisy the Rode VideoMicro can make your audio on specific electronic cameras. Provided that the Rode VideoMicro was frequently favoured by many (including me) over the original Rode VideoMic GO, the VideoMic GO II is an entire new level of quality, practically matching the VideoMic NTG

In the video at the top of this evaluation, there are numerous contrasts between the Rode VideoMic GO II alongside the Rode VideoMic NTG and the crowd favourite Rode VideoMicro. They were recorded all at once using three Panasonic G80 cameras (thats the G85 for you folks in the USA), with the audio settings on each set identically.

The fluffy windshield

The Rode WS12 Deluxe Windshield does not come provided with the Rode VideoMic GO II. All that features it is the foam one and this is an optional extra. But to me, if youre intending on taking a shotgun mic like this outdoors (and who isnt if youre vlogging with it on top of your camera?) Theres nothing optional about it. Its an essential and you ought to certainly buy it. It does include $30 to the expense of the microphone, but its worth it.

The Rode WS12 Deluxe Windshield is an outright must if you shoot outdoors!

Without the windshield, clipping from the wind sound was extremely apparent making speech unintelligible when it selected up. With the windscreen, I didnt hear a peep from the wind and my voice was clearly able to be heard.

As you can hear in the video above, though, there actually isnt much difference at all between using the microphone “naked” or utilizing it with the WS12 Deluxe Windshield, so youre not going to take the hit in audio quality that you often make with windscreens.

How does it sound over USB?

When serving as a digital audio gadget over USB, the 3.5 mm TRS socket ends up being an earphone jack for tracking

This is where things get quite interesting. Since now the VideoMic GO II gets a lot more power offered to it over that USB cable television and as an outcome gains a number of functions found in the VideoMic NTG through its external buttons.

For this test, I plugged both microphones into the Type-A USB sockets of my laptop computer and recorded the audio in Rode Connect. I did effort to record in Adobe Audition, however it only has access to either a single microphone at when or the stereo mix of both microphones integrated.

When youre utilizing the microphone as a digital USB audio device, the 3.5 mm TRS output ends up being a headphone monitoring socket, letting you listen in on your recording. If you wind up getting numerous VideoMic GO II microphones for taping numerous individuals simultaneously, like a podcast, this lets everybody eavesdrop on earphones to their own microphone to make certain theyre positioned where theyre expected to be in front of it.

The Rode Connect software application permits you to blend and stream however likewise record multiple microphones in a real multichannel mix

The Rode VideoMic GO II is offered to buy now for $99. The Rode SC16 Type-C to Type-C USB and SC18 Type-C to Type-A USB cable televisions are offered to buy now for $15 each. The Rode SC15 Type-C USB to Lightning cable is readily available to purchase now for $25 and Rode WS12 Deluxe Windshield for the VideoMic GO II is offered to buy now for $29.

Rode just recently launched their brand-new Rode VideoMic GO II, changing the VideoMic GO in their lineup. Like the VideoMic NTG, the VideoMic GO II features a USB socket for when you desire to use it as a digital audio device plugged straight into your computer or mobile phone.

You can likewise enable and disable specific microphone features through the Rode Connect user interface.

General thoughts

The VideoMicro is the quietest and the VideoMic NTG is the loudest with the VideoMic GO II sitting somewhere in between but leaning closer to the VideoMic NTG. Running noise reduction on audio from the VideoMicro (and the initial VideoMic GO II) was quite basic before I changed to the VideoMic NTG– now I seldom have to do any kind of noise reduction in post.

If youre a vlogger who does not need all the bells and whistles of the VideoMic NTG (although you do still get some of them when using it as a USB audio gadget), youve just got one camera to stress over and youre attempting to restrict the budget plan, the Rode VideoMic GO II is likely the microphone you need to go for. Even if youre not using the on-camera audio in your last edit however simply want something better quality than the built-in mics for easier syncing in post, the VideoMic GO II is a inexpensive and wonderful alternative for that.

In general, theres not much to do not like about this microphone, especially for what it costs. The one multi-device driver concern does have a 3rd celebration workaround, so even thats a minor thing. It easily holds its own against similarly priced microphones, beats practically all of the more economical microphones and punches extremely much above its weight in some aspects (like when its linked to a computer system or smartphone).

For computer use with Zoom, Skype, etc or for recording voiceovers at the computer system, with the additional features paid for by the Rode Central/Connect apps, then the VideoMic GO II quickly holds its own against the VideoMic NTG.

If you want the absolute best Rode has to offer on top of your camera, then go for the VideoMic NTG. It is objectively a better microphone and has some unique advantages when utilized on-camera, so the VideoMic NTG is still worth getting if you can justify the expense.

For computer use with Zoom, Skype, etc or for recording voiceovers at the computer system, with the additional functions afforded by the Rode Central/Connect apps, then the VideoMic GO II quickly holds its own versus the VideoMic NTG. In reality, if this is all youre using it for, I d argue that the VideoMic GO II is perhaps the much better choice. As mentioned above, though, it would be nice if you could use numerous Rode USB microphones concurrently and be able to access and tape them separately across several tracks in applications like Adobe Audition.

Regarding the real sound quality, its really similar to the Rode VideoMic NTG, specifically when you turn on that HF increase to provide your voice a little more existence and richness. Normally, with the VideoMic NTG, I do not switch on the existence boost, but with the VideoMic GO II, it sounds great and offers it simply that bit of additional zest.

You can also adjust the input level and turn on the pad if its a little loud. You can likewise adjust the headphone output volume– which you may desire to do, depending on the earphones youre utilizing.

With a rate tag of just $99, the Rode VideoMic GO II is a great little microphone. Its certainly much better than the Rode VideoMicro which suggests its also certainly better than its original VideoMic GO predecessor. Is it as excellent as the Rode VideoMic NTG? Well, no, but thats a $250 microphone, so you cant truly anticipate it to be. The VideoMic NTG offers benefits that the VideoMic GO II cant, just because it has a built-in battery. Theyre extremely close when utilized over USB, though.

Note: You might potentially get around this limitation (a minimum of on Windows) by utilizing the ASIO4ALL motorist. Whether or not you d still have the ability to adjust the settings of the microphone while recording when using it I do not know, as it isnt a setup I evaluated. Hypothetically, however, it should work. I utilize the ASIO4ALL chauffeur on my desktop when utilizing the VideoMic NTG plugged into the USB alongside my Behringer U-PHORIA UMC404HD USB audio interface so that Adobe Audition can access both USB gadgets all at once and it works great. Because circumstances, though, I dont require access to the Rode software application with the VideoMic NTG as it has the buttons.

Side note: You can likewise enable and disable these functions on the VideoMic NTG through the Rode Connect interface, too, so that you dont have to hit buttons and risk bumping your mic mid-record (or mid-stream, if youre a banner).