May 16, 2022

This 50mm f/0.95 face-off puts Laowa vs Mitakon vs TTArtisan vs Brightin Star lenses against each other

Despite the price inconsistency between the most and least expensive of the lenses, Christopher says the develop quality of all 4 lenses is pretty similar, with all of them having a strong metal construction. However there are workflow distinctions in between them. The Mitakon, for example, provides a practically 360 ° toss on the focus ring for super great control– practically essential for lenses this brilliant– and features a deeper lens hood to reduce the flaring that usually occurs with lenses that have this wide an aperture.

I think a lens with the optical quality of the Laowa and the enormous focus toss series of the Mitakon would be the suitable for me. How about you?

Despite the price discrepancy between the most and least expensive of the lenses, Christopher pricey the build quality of all states lenses is pretty similar, 4 all of them having a solid metal construction. Other lenses, such as the Laowa deal both clicky and stepless apertures, making it potentially much better matched to video use, although none of these lenses is best. With a lens of this type, that edge softness may be something you prefer for that “lomo” retro appearance– specifically with that flare!

In this video, Christopher Frost puts four full-frame 50mm f/0.95 lenses to the test to see how they compare to each other, including the Mitakon, TTArtisan, Brightin Star and the recently announced Laowa Argus lens. The Laowa is a hair larger than the other 3 at 45mm rather than 50, but its close enough.

The most inexpensive of the lot by far is the Brightin Star 50mm f/0.95 costing around half the cost of the others at just $390 and is available in a variety of mounts consisting of Sony E, Canon RF, Nikon Z, Fuji X and Leica L.

The Mitakon 50mm f/0.95 III and Laowa Argus 45mm f/0.95 both expense around $800 and are readily available for Sony E, Canon RF and Nikon Z installs. The TTArtisan 50mm f/0.95 is a bit cheaper at around $755 and is only available in Leica M mount, although that can be pretty quickly adapted to practically any mirrorless install. The most affordable of the bunch by far is the Brightin Star 50mm f/0.95 costing around half the price of the others at only $390 and is offered in a variety of installs including Sony E, Canon RF, Nikon Z, Fuji X and Leica L.

When it pertains to really shooting them, however, the sharpness tests are very telling with the Laowa offering the best total sharpness and contrast throughout the whole frame. The other three all tend to blur a little, even in the centre however specifically as you go out towards the edges of the frame. With a lens of this type, that edge softness may be something you prefer for that “lomo” retro appearance– especially with that flare!

Other lenses, such as the Laowa offer both stepless and clicky apertures, making it potentially much better suited to video usage, although none of these lenses is best. What may put video shooters off with all of them is that they all seem to display some pretty significant focus breathing. Similarly, none is weather-sealed, which is a crucial factor for those shooting in more extreme conditions.

There seem to be a lot of extremely fast lens choices these days, even for full-frame cams. Really few are them are coming from the long-established big-name companies like the video camera producers themselves and even Sigma and Tamron, but there are a great deal of manual focus ones originating from some of the newer Chinese lens manufacturers.

If I had to force myself to choose among these and cost wasnt a factor, I think the Argus looks best overall in Christophers tests, however I do not believe I d pick to buy any of them, truly. Not simply yet, anyhow. All of them have problems and compromises that suggest they fall back the other 3 in some regard or other.